MarTech and AdTech News Headlines Update on June 18, 2021

Make ’em laugh

Something funny is generally something memorable. So to get customers to engage with and remember your brand, tell them a joke. How do you do this without coming off corny or offensive?

I’m on a horse

Humour can revitalise a brand. 12 years on, the Old Spice commercial is still funny but more importantly it doubled the sales of a product largely associated with old men. Today, the commercial’s YouTube views are pushing 60 million and growing.

Sometimes life isn’t funny

Things like a global pandemic and lockdown aren’t necessarily funny. But, it’s during these situations some consumers need a laugh. A report by GlobalWebIndex found consumers were searching for funny content. For brands, you just need to get the tone right.

Journalists and content marketing

When journalists enter the marketing sector, the standard joke is they’ve joined the “dark side”. The truth is the skills journalists bring to content marketing are a blessing to the industry (trust us, we know). Research, storytelling, questioning and understanding the audience.

Why are journalists leaving?

As the advertising dollars moved away from media organisations, working conditions changed. Journalists experienced a decrease in work-life balance, pay and appreciation of the profession, as well as an increase in the commercialisation of news. So they quit.

Shared goals

Ultimately, the professional goal of the journalist and content marketer is the same. Publish content that informs, inspires and engages the audience. Maybe a little newsroom urgency could help the marketing side though?

Live or pre-record?

For better or worse, virtual events and webinars, are here to stay. While the technology behind digital events has improved production values and engagement levels, hosts still have to decide on one thing — will it be live or pre-recorded?

Why it matters

Even after lockdowns are lifted (and that is still a long way off) virtual events will remain. From a business perspective, they’re a more cost-effective way to reach a larger audience. And from an audience perspective, the events they can attend aren’t dictated by geography.

A hybrid approach

The future for events will probably be a mixture of real-life and digital attendance. The big event platforms are betting on it. Zoom Events is designed for single events that cater to both in-person and virtual attendees.

B2B vs B2C marketing

B2B and B2C marketing generally have the same goal — they want to make the brand top of mind when it comes to purchasing decisions. The difference lies in the strategies each of these sectors uses to reach this goal. For B2B, a creative content marketing approach is bound to more effective than a slogan that sticks in your head.

Is B2B boring?

Many consider B2B marketing as something boring that can become engaging if you make it funny or emotive. The truth is B2B is about stories highlighting “conflict, challenge, failure, opportunity, victory” that make the messaging more engaging.

Leveraging employee engagement

What B2B marketers overlook is authentic stories often come from within. Engaged employees on social media can act as brand advocates, pushing stories of conflict, challenge and victory in a way B2C strategies can’t.

TRENDS

Something strange is happening in U.S. media. Newsroom jobs are coming back. The economy didn’t collapse, the sky didn’t fall, and events are returning.

Annual U.S. media job losses. 2008 to 2021; 2021 losses are through May. Data: Challenger, Gray & Christmas; Chart: Andrew Witherspoon/Axios

Netflix is already great at getting you to blow your weeknights bingeing on its content. But the real catch could come with its direct-to-consumer retail play to get you to buy some TV show merch. Bet you didn’t see that coming. It’s 2021 and IP = product.

VC firm Andreessen Horowitz launched Future, a content site to push back on what it believes is an excessively negative view of the industry. Call it PR. Many tech journos are seething. Here’s what it looks like.

Sony Music Entertainment acquired Somethin’ Else, the UK’s biggest independent podcast producer. Terms weren’t disclosed. It wasn’t for the content — SME wanted the company’s top execs to drive its global podcast business.

DESIGN FOR COMMUNITY

Herne Katha, the mighty web video series about people in Nepal that publishes every two weeks, just reached 500,000 subscribers. Kamal, one of the co-founders, sent me this message: “Namaskar Rishad. Herne Katha is reaching 500k subscribers in a few days. We would like to create 500k dots in a single image to say thank you to them. How could that be possible? 🤔”, I was late in responding. When I followed up a few days later, he sent me this delightful message: “Hey Rishad, we ended up with this design. i typed the dots in Pages counted the characters and exported the file into Photoshop. it says “There are 500K dots in this image, you are one of them… thank you for this uncountable love” Such a beautiful idea, and such great execution. Kamal — sometimes the last thing you need for great design is a designer. See what he did here.

Google is going woke and I love it. If you type “chairman” into a Google Doc, it’ll recommend “chairperson”. “Mailman” will suggest “mail carrier”. I know — you’re rolling your eyes a bit, but I think that if our tools help us be more sensitive and inclusive in the ways we communicate, what’s not to love? The feature is rolling out in bits, and it hasn’t hit my Workspace yet.

How do design books get made? There’s the old way, where a publisher or an agent reads through thousands of pitches, commissions one with an advance, and handles the marketing and events, and hopes for the best sales. Then there’s Volume, a Thames & Hudson imprint, who crowd-funds with hyper-specific audiences to create books that people actually want. People have raised funding for art and design books on Kickstarter for ages, so it’s an old indie model. But this may be the first time a major imprint like Thames & Hudson is working the niche crowdfunding funnel exclusively for design book projects. And Volume can function as a lean startup with quick decision-making and processes, but with the weight of a giant publisher behind them with all the relationships, network, research, and distribution muscle that comes with it. So many lessons here for legacy news companies.

NEWSLETTER

The email open rate — the primary metric for newsletter folks like us — is in trouble. Apple is rolling out something it calls the Mail Privacy Protection, a little something that “helps users prevent senders from knowing when they open an email, and masks their IP address so it can’t be linked to other online activity or used to determine their location”.

The problem is the majority of newsletters, including this one, carries a little pixel that fires the moment the email is opened. This allows us to figure out if you actually opened the newsletter, which is useful in helping us understand if this is indeed something that’s useful for you. (We typically get a 45-50% open rate, so thank you!)

Still, this upcoming change may actually not affect us all that much since it’s really for folks that 1) are on iPhones and 2) read their emails on the Apple Mail app on the iPhone. Thankfully, 81% of you read this on your desktop, and overwhelmingly on Gmail.

But for the rest of the newslettering industry, this could be a massive hit for those who are overweighted on Apple Mail readers. My worry is that other mail apps will follow suit.

Ben Thompson launched Passport. When he unleashed Stratechery’s Daily Update, the granddaddy of paid newsletters, seven years ago on a ready-to-pay audience, there were no Substack-like tools for people in the independent subscription business. So he built a daisy chain of digital services for sign-up, paywall, payment, and CRM. Now he’s built Passport, a tool to integrate all of that — enterprise software for creators. Here are the broad headlines:

  • Creators using Passport have “the ability to fully customize a website to a powerful templating system to single sign-on capabilities.”
  • It enables a smoother experience for users, including a more personalised experience: all of their content — podcasts, RSS, email — is customised, accessible, and seamlessly integrated. This is the dream: one-to-one creator-to-user communication at scale.
  • There’s also exciting stuff like Passport-to-Passport add-ons and cross-promotion, which means that two completely different Passport-powered businesses can sell subscriptions to each other’s products, which is EXACTLY the network effect that the creator economy and audience needs.
    Passport isn’t a subscription management service. It’s flexible in that it can work with any subscription management service — Stratechery uses Stripe Billing, but you wouldn’t have to give up your newsroom’s existing service to use it.
  • Passport also has a fully featured experience for free members, so your publication doesn’t have to be subscription-based to use it, but allows for your free members to have a seamless transition to paid membership.

Ghost seems to be getting a bit of attention for luring writers off Substack. The latter has pissed off a number of independent journalists who disagree with the company’s moderation policies. So Ghost has been trying to get them to switch, but the comparison isn’t that straightforward.

Facebook is set to launch its Substack rival Bulletin later this month. It’s started recruiting writers — but it’s also avoiding political types that have caused Substack so much trouble.

TRANSFORMATION

In a big step forward, the AP will no longer name suspects involved in minor crime stories. “Usually, we don’t follow up with coverage about the outcome of the cases. We may not know if the charges were later dropped or reduced, as they often are, or if the suspect was later acquitted.” These stories — which often equate arrests as crimes themselves — have long lives on the internet.

News Corp wrote down the value of its London Sun newspaper to zero. In other words, the Sun is worthless. This perhaps the most important indication yet of the collapse of the UK newspaper industry. The Sun was the country’s biggest newspaper for decades, delivering both gossip and right-wing political coverage.

Media development work is undergoing a massive transformation this year. The pandemic has changed strategies at donors and has imposed new drivers of change. “[We need to] join up and collaborate, as much as we ask journalists to collaborate for efficiency. The donor community needs to be more collaborative as well.” (H/t Ross)

PLATFORMS

Spotify launched its Clubhouse competitor. Greenroom, a standalone app on iOS and Android, is the company’s first real stab at creating a social media network. As you’d expect, Greenroom will allow you to host live conversations — but here’s the magic: you can quickly turn those convos into podcasts when you’re done. It’s 2021 and everything is a live audio app.

Spotify also announced a fund to get U.S. creators publishing on Greenroom.We want creators to be rewarded for the communities they build, the audiences they reach, and the experiences they create from the very start.” It’s 2021 and everyone has a fund to get you to publish on their platform.

Facebook is finally getting podcasts. From next week, hosts will be able to link their RSS feeds up to FB, which will automatically create News Feed posts for all episodes. Unfortunately, these will apparently be buried in a “podcasts” tab.

But hey, read that comma-filled Terms of Service:

You grant Facebook the non-exclusive, royalty-free, worldwide right to use, market, promote, advertise, display, reproduce, create derivative works of, cache, transmit, distribute, make available (including via stream and download), store, sublicense and publicly perform/communicate to the public the Podcast(s) (or portion(s) thereof) and related materials, including, without limitation: sound recordings, musical compositions and any other content embodied in the Podcast(s); cover art, artwork, graphics, and written work containing text and/or images associated with a particular Podcast; the names, likenesses, images, trademarks, logos, biographical materials and other identifying materials associated with the applicable podcaster; other information relating to authorship, production and performances of the Podcast(s); and all metadata associated with the Podcast(s), such as Podcast name, host name, episode name, and/or names of participants in applicable Podcast episodes (collectively, the “Podcast Content”).

This is really interesting and it’s something that newsrooms should be thinking about as well. Facebook wants to know: When is it ok to divulge someone’s residential information? That’s such a complex question that it’s asked its Oversight Board to weigh in.

“Select a Plan to buy Facebook Post Likes”. Shady AF. Sophie Zhang, a former FB employee and now whistleblower, explains how fake engagement is created and how that’s shaped disinformation.

Twitter is trying out a way for you to “un-mention” yourself. Sometimes you just need to extract yourself from a thread that just went toxic.

Everyone with a Google account now has access to Workspace. That means a whole bunch of upgraded chat features, including chat rooms, direct messaging, and some kind of “smart canvas”. It all very confusing. But that means Google now has an even bigger addressable market of 3 billion people.

Facebook will no longer take down posts claiming that Covid-19 was man-made. Washington is seeking a proper investigation into the origins of the virus, so discussions around the theme of Covid-came-from-a-Wuhan-lab are no longer just another fringe conspiracy theory.

Twitter launched a local weather news service called Tomorrow. It’s working with local meteorologists and climate writers to produce newsletters (on the recently acquired Revue platform) and articles.

Twitter is adding full-screen ads to Fleets. The ephemeral tweet feature (a clone of Stories) is apparently so engaging that the company now believes it can make some money off it.

Substack is building out its international footprint. It’s going to start hiring more people as part of this push, according to Axios. “Where there’s an audience of people hungry enough for quality coverage and information that’s willing to pay then this model can work.”

Media journo Simon Owens pulled the plug on Medium. Despite having 12,900 followers, Owens realised what many have long suspected about Medium — the platform does practically nothing for network effects; most of his traffic was from outside Medium. Monetisation is poor as well. “If I add just 10 paying subscribers to my Substack newsletter, I generate more money in a single month than I did on Medium over the last year.”

Here’s an idea that a publisher should steal. Spotify now has data-driven personalised playlists that you can share with your friends. Two friends can also automatically merge their musical tastes into a single playlist. Could be an interesting idea for news articles.

Discord started out as a place for gamers to hang out and chat. Much has changed — 80% of users are now using it for non-gaming stuff. Now Discord has a new campaign to — get this — set itself up as an anti-Facebook space.

It’s almost funny that Facebook blurted this out. Instagram chief Adam Mosseri says they’re pushing offline transactions between creators and companies to help them skirt Apple’s 30% tax on in-app purchases. The Apple-30 is now everyone’s opportunity.

Apple Podcasts will finally launch in-app subscriptions next week. The upgrade has had all sorts of problems — delayed podcasts, messed up analytics, and lost artwork.

Who would have thought that a config change at a CDN that you may never have heard of could bring down the global internet? News outlets CNN, The Guardian, The New York Times, BBC and Financial Times (and pretty much everything else out there), went down for almost an hour — and all because one user decided to update their settings.

OPPORTUNITIES

This is what paying-it-forward looks like in this community. Kirsten Han, who writes the We, The Citizens newsletter, is offering journalists or “people who have interest in writing” support and advice around story ideas, pitches, and editing. Kirsten will be talking about this mini-mentorship program on our weekly Splice Lo-Fi audio room today (four hours from when this email lands in your inbox).

Facebook is looking for someone who can guide the development of content policies in Asia. That means thinking up guidelines on what people can post, what they can advertise, and what they can monetise. This is an incredibly important job when it comes to speech in this region. The role is based in Singapore.

Global Investigative Journalism Network has an advisory program for watchdog media outlets in Asia. They’re offering a free assessment of your organisation, as well as advice for priority areas for support.

THE TIPPING ECONOMY

We should pay for good work. This includes services, products, and the spectrum of content in between. This makes tipping on media platforms an amazing feature. But tipping that seeks to compensate for a broken system of underpaying creators by outsourcing the burden to the whim of the consumer is evil. We’re looking at you, Spotify. Like most platforms, you launched a tip jar, but you’re paying artists a per-stream rate of around $0.50. (Reminds you of another broken system of compensation? That’s right — the U.S. restaurant business, famous for underpaying its workers enough to pervert the concept of tipping, which is usually discretionary in most cultures, into a codified expectation around worker remuneration that they outsource to their customers.) Meanwhile, Snapchat recently paid a woman half a million dollars for a video of someone deep-frying a turkey.

PRODUCT

This NYT vaccine mind-changer chatbot isn’t going to pass the Turing test in a hurry, but it’s still an incredibly powerful way to use tech for good. What do you do if your friend is tending towards the anti-vaxxer end of the vaccine hesitancy spectrum? You yell at having a gentle chat with them to understand where their fears come from, and then step up, be a good friend, and help them make a better decision. For example, “Don’t believe everything you read on Facebook. I’ll send you some reliable articles.” is “Not a good choice. At this early stage in the vaccine conversation, the others aren’t ready to accept new information from you. You must first earn their trust by showing you understand and care about their concerns. Try this instead: “OK, so you’re conflicted. You want to be safe from Covid, but you’re worried about the shot and want reassurance?”

Hacking has been productized. Welcome to ransomware-as-a-service. This story from The New Yorker blew my mind. The idea of the lone wolf hacker or the radical, disorganized pack of disaffected masked youth in hoodies worming their way into mainframes around the world might be a tad dated now. DarkSide, the enterprise behind the recent Colonial Pipeline ransomware attack in the U.S., didn’t actually conduct cyberattacks; it was a one-stop hub with a range of services for hackers who did. It had a blog, a marketplace-like system that allowed for different types of hackers to collaborate, a user-friendly interface, and products and services available for a sliding fee scale that included handling negotiations, processing payments, their own malware for freezing and extracting data, ransom value determination, victim communications, and arranging payment. It seemed to work pretty well before it was shut down: Analysts found that “a Bitcoin wallet opened by DarkSide had received seventeen and a half million dollars since March, including the [nearly five million dollars] payout from Colonial Pipeline.”

Play a painting. I’ve always loved Google Arts & Culture. They blew up a few years ago when you could use their AI to take a selfie and then see what painting character you looked like. Now they’re back with an experiment in synesthesia — you can hear the colours in the Russian painter Wassily Kandinsky’s talismanic work Yellow-Red-Blue “with the help of machine learning”. Kandinsky was a synesthete himself, which makes it a little more special. The idea is to listen to the painting “as Kandinsky might have heard it and interpreted by composers Antoine Bertin and NSDOS.” The painter associated the colour yellow with the sound of a trumpet (and with cheekiness, “warmth, excitement, disturbance, rage and madness”), and I sort of kind of agree. Exciting stuff.

Singlish Logo Parodies is a Telegram sticker pack of 120 logos remixed Singlish style. If you, like me, want to see the worlds of design, logos, and Singlish collide, this sticker pack is for you. So good. The maker is a person who Instagrams as @samuellieu (currently set to Private). Get the pack here.

In response to that map of the internet in last week’s newsletter, Josh sent me this map of all the subreddits in the world. This thing is endlessly fascinating. If this is indeed a representation of the front page of the internet (as Reddit quite credibly claims it is), it’s heartening to see that most of it is fairly wholesome (porn gets its own continent). Or maybe I’m just being naive. (Here’s last week’s map.)

PRODUCT LAUNCHES EVERYWHERE!

The Kirsten has a new mentorship program. Kirsten Han, of the amazing We, The Citizens newsletter, is offering journalists or “people who have interest in writing” support and advice around story ideas, pitches, and editing. “I’m doing this because, over the years, I’ve come across, or been contacted by, people who want to become journalists, want to work on their writing skills, or have important stories to tell. Some email me to ask for advice about freelancing, or about writing.” The mentorship program is open to Singaporeans and people in Singapore, writing about Singapore.

Ben Thompson launched Passport. When he unleashed Stratechery’s Daily Update, the granddaddy of paid newsletters, seven years ago on a ready-to-pay audience, there were no Substack-like tools for people in the independent subscription business. So he built a daisy chain of digital services for sign-up, paywall, payment, and CRM. Now he’s built Passport, a tool to integrate all of that — enterprise software for creators. Here are the broad headlines:

  • Creators using Passport have “the ability to fully customize a website to a powerful templating system to single sign-on capabilities.”
  • It enables a smoother experience for users, including a more personalised experience: all of their content — podcasts, RSS, email — is customised, accessible, and seamlessly integrated. This is the dream: one-to-one creator-to-user communication at scale.
  • There’s also exciting stuff like Passport-to-Passport add-ons and cross-promotion, which means that two completely different Passport-powered businesses can sell subscriptions to each other’s products, which is EXACTLY the network effect that the creator economy and audience needs.
  • Passport isn’t a subscription management service — it is flexible in that it can work with any subscription management service — Stratechery uses Stripe Billing, but you wouldn’t have to give up your newsroom’s existing service to use it.
  • Passport also has a fully featured experience for free members, so your publication doesn’t have to be subscription-based to use it, but allows for your free members to have a seamless transition to paid membership.

Wapatoa now has a podcast and audio series. The Cambodia media startup that guides their young adult community on how to adult already have their podcast Tok Toch ranked at number three on Apple Podcasts in Cambodia. The first episodes are on mental health, habits, and how to be resilient in the time of the pandemic. Alix, one of the co-founders, told me “‘Tok Toch’ means tiny table — because we stay cheap 😂”

Paid Twitter has that edit function you’ve waiting been for. It’s called Twitter Blue, and for 4.49 Australian dollars, you get a few seconds to edit your tweets, much like the Unsend function for email, manage your bookmarks into folders, change your app icon colour (who knew this could be a paid feature??), and my favourite: reader-mode for threads.

Facebook’s Substack clone is called Bulletin. But they don’t want you to write for it just yet (in case you’re too controversial like them Substack writers); at launch, it’s only for the writers that Facebook recruits and pays. Here are some things to know:

  • Bulletin will live outside Facebook. So if you click on a Bulletin link inside the FB app, it will open in a new browser window
  • There will be a free version — and ultimately, a paid version
  • It’s offering its writers two-year deals with an option to opt out after one year
  • There’s talk of FB not wanting a cut of the subscription revenue that writers will make (“Substack takes 10 percent of its writers’ subscription fees, and Twitter’s Revue takes 5 percent.”)
  • Like the other two, Bulletin will allow writers to take their audience lists with them if they choose to leave

What I really want to know about, though, is the person who made a reported six million dollars by selling the bulletin.com url to Facebook.

Weather-as-a-product has been a thing for a while. But when Twitter pulled in Eric Holthaus (the “rebel nerd of meteorology”, according to Rolling Stone), it’s now taken on a whole new relevance, sadly thanks to the climate emergency. The new worldwide weather service was previously called Tomorrow but is now called Currently, which sounds like a meta weather nerd inside joke unto itself. “We’re combining some of the best meteorologists with weather journalists that will contextualize everything from hurricanes to fires to a good beach day to climate justice.” It all makes perfect sense: most conversations begin with the weather + Twitter is about conversations = Twitter acquires weather. I’m excited about this.

LEARNING

Thanks to Covid, NYT, WSJ, and even Rolling Stone have started online education programs. Coursera, they’re coming for you.

THE CREATOR ECONOMY

Did an independent journo just fund his newsletter via NFTs? Of course he did. Kyle Chayka writes Dirt, a daily entertainment and culture newsletter, and he just made a killing in a week. NYT, Quartz, and Time magazine have been selling NFTs for individual covers and articles, “but there haven’t been any examples of NFTs being used as a more sustainable funding mechanism for journalists as creators.”

Separately, Tim Berners-Lee, the creator of the www, is selling off its original code as an NFT. When you buy it, you get over 9,500 lines of code that contain the basics of the internet like HTTP and HTML, as well as an animated visualisation of the code, a digital poster signed by him, and a letter he wrote reflecting on his incredible creation.

NON-LAUNCH PRODUCT

Meanwhile, this is a quick reminder that the four highest-earning iPhone games each make a million dollars. A day. Roblox tops that list because it makes $3 million a day. Of course, the “highest-grossing iPhone game in last year’s report was one no longer available on the App Store: Fortnite.”

Did you tell me you wanted the world’s most amazing map of the internet? This thing is really something. Is it pretty? Sure, but the problem it seeks to solve is important: the internet is huge and difficult to comprehend. So the map wants to solve that by helping to gauge the relative size of different websites and web properties by visualising them as countries on a map. (Google and YouTube are the two largest countries.) The countries are grouped into clusters based on content type: news, search, e-commerce, file-sharing…) The border colours of each country are the colours of the website’s logo or user interface or file sharing. Website founders are capital cities. And the bodies of water are works of whimsy: I’m currently being sunburned on the shores of the Modem Sea, and will possibly soon drown in the Bandwidth Ocean if my internet doesn’t come back. This thing is profound in that

  1. It visualises a (mostly) borderless thing like the Web in a way we understand, and
  2. It illustrates how things like economics and affiliations and belonging and citizenry transcend geographical boundaries more profoundly than ever before. Look at it. Cancel all your meetings for the day and just… look at it.

This artist just sold an invisible sculpture. It’s made of nothing. The “immaterial sculpture” sold for $18,300. Salvatore Garau, the artist, stipulated that the work had to be “exhibited in a private house in a roughly five-by-five-foot space free of obstruction”. Bonus: if you click the link, you can see a picture of the artist standing next to his creation. (So if somebody said they’d stolen it in the world’s simplest art heist, how would they know? Asking for a friend.)

GREAT PRODUCT COMES FROM GREAT MANAGEMENT

A good manager can change your life. Here are some real — and very powerful — stories about how to be that change in your media organization.

TYPOGRAPHY

If you’re a type-head, you should play Foont. What’s your high score?

GAMING

Women are buying more PlayStations. Sony blew some minds — and some stereotypes – when they announced recently that 41% of PS4 and PS5 owners are female. The increase is mainly thanks to “the growing diversity in our industry’s workforce and by a growing catalog of iconic female characters.”

41% of PS4 and PS5 owners are female
41% of PS4 and PS5 owners are female

GRAPHIC DESIGN

I love this cover for the NYT Magazine’s Money issue. The story is literally right there on the cover. So simple. Much wow.

Interesting Marketing Video to Watch

Procter & Gamble tug at the heartstrings with an inspirational short about the importance of a mother’s guidance for an Olympic boxer.

Twitch combines comedy with manga-inspired animation to showcase the mythical gamer, Ninja.

Zendesk turns a customer success story with Drizly into a fast-paced skit featuring out-of-control cats.

IBM uses striking and distinct animation to highlight the design thinking behind its business ethos.

The next big step for drone technology? According to Huawei, it’s delivering coffee. #HuaweiNow

Ever wondered where the world’s corsets were made? We did, so we partnered with UPS to find out.

Mental health is a challenging subject so Mezamé used metaphor heavy animation to explain its new psychological therapy practice.

Kebabs are the delicacy of choice across the globe once last drinks are called. Square makes these late-night purchases easy.

Puma embraces street culture with professional BMXer Ryan Taylor riding around the grim streets of Birmingham.

Liquid Ai uses motion graphics to explain how complex targeted digital marketing relates to the first piece of market research carried out over 600 years ago.

Published by Jeannette Scott

, a wellness coach specializing in stress management and quality of life. She’s covered topics from nutrition to psychology, from sexuality to autoimmune diseases and cancer.